RNDA-DRNDA

This term originates from the rarely used noun drnda, denoting something threadbare, shabby, exhausted, worn out, battered...

Here, (generally used only the short form: drnda) – the expression itself doesn't mean anything! However, it can function as a joker-noun, enriching language this way, introducing yet another (baffling, though!) solution beside a relative pronoun usage! (I could never come to terms with left & right, there's always the “relative to what” part missing, so it is much simpler/accurate for me to just utter the universal „there“ and suggest the desired direction somehow)! ... Thus, when a speaker wishes to express quickly a complex idea (or possibly a simple one, but (s)he cannot (due to haste) remember an appropriate term) it is possible to use a demonstrative pronoun and/or a joker-noun, of course – hoping that the audience be focused & clever enough to comprehend from the context what is talked about! The exscessively frequent use of the word rnda-drnda indicates the speaker's carelessness and/or distraction (sometimes even the Alzheimer’s disease or simply – ordinary senility; in which case it is encouraging fact that the person can remember even this word!), but can indicate also the possible aphasia or a related speech disorder! Modest use means generally that the speaker simply has too many associations on his/her mind, but cannot afford any digression because of the urge to act immediately! Actually, this word implies also a little higher level of communication – the non-verbal communication (also, without any form of body-language!), requesting active participation of all involved, almost the telepathy! Eg: a surgeon is carrying out a very complicated operation; the procedure is flowing easily and smoothly. Suddenly – a patient's artery bursts! Blood spraying all over the room, staining the walls, the surgeon cannot see what he's doing! Moreover, his mind boggles and blocks, so he can only murmur to his assistant: „Drnd this!“, and to the O.R. nurse „Gimme that drnda, quick!“. The assisting surgeon cleans the critical spot with the sucking device, the nurse hands a clip...

The above example shows that the word drnda can assume the function of a verb, as well! (Actually, also – of an adjective/adverb! Eg. drndly... The root (drnd) remains the same, all morphological endrndments must follow the grammatical/morphological rules of the particular language – all languages applicable, according to their grammars, of course!) Semantical connotation of the coined word depends heavily, naturally, on the context!... ;-}